idealchef.com

Joined :12/11/2010 | Video Recipes: 0 | Follow Chef
Basalt, CO United States

"I am the third generation in a restaurant family.


My grandmother's home and café was a chalet actually inside the 1936 Olympic Stadium in the Bavarian Alps.


My mother's restaurant, Gretl's, was one of the most famous restaurants in Aspen, Colorado in the 60's and 70's. Princes, movie stars, moguls and simple folk all became her friends.


The atmosphere there was so incredible that everyone wanted to be at Gretl's or to work at Gretl's, no matter how rich or poor they were. If you walked in feeling lousy, you always walked out feeling absolutely spectacular!


When I left home at 18, I became the head scenic artist for the Juilliard Theater at Lincoln Center in New York. Soon I became an assistant set designer for  theaters and opera houses in the U.S., Canada and Europe.


At the end of every work day, we would gather at some of the finest restaurant tables with the likes of Jean-Pierre Ponnelle, Nicolas Joël, Pet Halmen, Luciano Pavarotti and other luminaries to discuss the day's events and plans for the next day over fine food and wine.


Sometimes we would all gather at the homes of people like James Levine and everyone would rotate through the kitchen in an hours-long festival of cooking just to relax from the demanding day at the opera. It was here I learned the joy and power inherent in our most common foundation - cooking and food.


Many years later when my family and I moved back to Aspen, the first thing my mother did was to buy a table and chairs for our home.  She said, " The table is the single most important piece of furniture in a house. It is the glue that holds a family and friends together."


Cooking is central to everything we do.


It is in our kitchen and at our table that we meet with family and friends and it is here we share our  joy and sadness, our learning and the  celebrations and stories of our lives."


- Anton Uhl -


from the introduction in the cookbook, Cooking With Anton, Book 1, The Basics